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Adelaide City Mission

The Adelaide City Mission was established in 1867, its principal aim being the “evangelisation of the neglected classes“.┬áThe Mission was involved in various charitable activities with Adelaide’s poor, and also organised religious activities such as gospel meetings (The Register, 20 July 1927). In 1926, the Adelaide City Mission opened the Aboriginal Women’s Home in the…

Visit to Australia of Major-General Hawthorn, director and secretary of Fairbridge Society

Visit to Australia of Major-General Hawthorn, director and secretary of Fairbridge Society is a file held by the National Archives of Australia. It is part of the correspondence files of the Commonwealth Immigration Department. It contains information about the activities of the Fairbridge Society in Australia. Access Conditions Open access. Records The hard copy file…

Borstal

A borstal (or borstall) was a reformatory for young offenders aged about 16 to 21. The term was used between about 1920 and 1970. Click here to see the full Find & Connect glossary

Lying-in Home

Lying-in Home was a term to describe a maternity home from the late nineteenth century, a place ‘for the accommodation of females during their confinement and lying-in’, to quote the Western Australian State Children Act 1907. At a lying-in home, a mother could give birth with the help of a midwife (who might not have…

Admission Unit

Admission Units were established by the South Australian Department for Community Welfare after the passing of the 1972 Community Welfare Act. A number of existing cottage Homes became units. Admission units were used for short term crisis care and for children deemed to have behavioural problems. Although units were intended to provide short term accommodation,…

Group Home

Group Home was a term used in the late 1970s to refer to a Home for children and young people who required ‘therapeutic care’. Group homes could be either scattered (ie in the community) or clustered (located with other group Homes on a campus, usually where there had previously been a children’s Home). This type…

Probationary School

Probationary Schools were institutions for children considered to be exhibiting troublesome behaviour that was not serious enough to warrant placement in a reformatory. The schools provided what was referred to at the time as disciplinary training. There were 2 probationary schools in South Australia from 1900 until 1945, both run by the Salvation Army, the…

Community Unit

A Community Unit was a smaller group residential care unit. This term was used in South Australia from the 1970s for longer term small group care. Community Units were to provide care and support for a range of children in State ‘care’ including young people on remand or children considered to be at risk. Some…

Convalescent Home

A Convalescent Home was a place where children were sent to rest and recover from illnesses, or after a stay in hospital. Sometimes the term was used to describe a home for women suffering from sexually transmitted infections (such institutions were also known as Lock Hospitals or Contagious Diseases Hospitals). Click here to see the…

Depot

A depot (or receiving depot) was a type of institution for children. In the nineteenth century and twentieth century, a receiving depot was an institution for the temporary admission of children, from which they would be admitted into a placement in a children’s Home or foster care. Depots also provided short-term accommodation between placements. From…