• Organisation

Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1937 - 1950

Church of England Boys’ Society Training Farm

The Church of England Boys’ Society Training Farm was established in 1937 in Lysterfield. It was first managed by The Rev. R.G. Nichols, and in 1942 was taken over by the Church of England Boys’ Society (Cebs). In 1945, the Farm moved to Yering. In 1950, the Training Farm was transferred to Burton Hall at Tatura, and the Yering property was sold. The Church of England Boys’ Society Training Farm was originally situated at Lysterfield. The land was purchased in 1935 by The Rev. R.G. Nichols who was organiser and honorary secretary of the farm from 1937. The Rev. Nichols handed over management of the Training Farm to the Church of England Boys’ Society (Cebs) in 1942. When Cebs took over the Farm in 1942, there were 40 boys in residence there. At the farm the boys were taught skills necessary for farm life, including raising poultry and cows, dairy-work, vegetable gardening, ploughing of fields and harvesting of crops, and meal preparation. The training farm also had a school attac

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1895 - c. 1972

Burwood Boys’ Home

The Burwood Boys’ Home was established in 1895 by Robert Campbell Edwards and run by non-denominational Committee of Management. The Home first housed boys aged between 9 and 15. Girls were accepted to the Home from the early 1970s, when the name changed to the Burwood Children’s Home. The Burwood Boys’ Home, at 155 Warrigal Road, Burwood, was established in 1895. Its founder was Robert Campbell Edwards, an Irish-born tea merchant. It was operated by a non-denominational Committee of Management, and was incorporated in 1909. Burwood Boys’ Home was ‘an approved institution’ under the Children’s Welfare Act 1928. It was run as a farming community. The Home was deregistered in 1936, and boys were transferred to Minton Boys’ Home, while new buildings were being completed. It was re-registered in 1937/38. In 1939 there were 37 boys in the home, and by 1940 the number had increased to 47 and the home was at full capacity. The 1940 Annual Report for the committee of the home state

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Victoria

1957 - 1978

Providence Children’s Home

The Providence Children’s Home was established at Bacchus Marsh in 1957. It accommodated children from Victoria’s Dutch community, but was not exclusively for children from any national or religious group. It was established to accommodate children between 2 and 16 years, but also had babies and infants. Providence Children’s Home also ran three family group homes in Bacchus Marsh. After Providence Children’s Home closed in 1978, it became a hostel for elderly Dutch migrants, called Providence Village. Providence Children’s Home was established in 1957, and was initially a small hostel in a disused private hospital in Bacchus Marsh. Its function was to care for the children of Dutch ‘New Australians’ whilst their mother or family were indisposed. It also provided some temporary accommodation for migrant families. The Catholic priest Leo Maas of the Catholic Dutch Migrant Association was instrumental in the establishment of the Home. It was established to cater for children from V

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1950 - 1973

Lutheran Children’s Home

The Lutheran Children’s Home (also known as the Lutheran Peace Memorial Home) was established in 1950 by the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Australia. The Home, located in Canterbury Road, Surrey Hills, housed the children of widowed post-war immigrants, to enable the women to work. In 1955, the Home relocated to a larger property in Sackville Street, Kew. This Home was closed in 1973. The Lutheran Church continued to operate family group homes in eastern Melbourne in the 1970s and 1980s, and also moved into foster care in the Glenelg region of south west Victoria from the 1980s. The Lutheran Children’s Home was officially opened on 22 October 1950. Its first location was at 760 Canterbury Road, Surrey Hills, in ‘a fine brick house, in a pretty garden’, as it was described by The Age in 1954. The Home, which could accommodate around 40 children at a time, was established to care for the children of widows who migrated to Australia following the Second World War, to enable

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Victoria

c. 1945 - 1982

Stanhope

Stanhope was a Legacy Home located in Kew established in around 1945. It accommodated the children of deceased ex-servicemen, and some wards of state, who were finishing their schooling. Stanhope housed boys and girls from around 9 to 16 years, except for part of 1970s when housed only girls aged 14 and over. Stanhope closed in 1982. Stanhope, at 1245 Burke Road Kew (on the corner of Cotham Road), was first purchased by the Victorian branch of the Australian Red Cross. The Red Cross remodelled the property and gifted it to Legacy in 1945 to be a residence for Legacy children while they were finishing their schooling. The formal handover took place in May 1948. At that time, there were 22 children in residence at Stanhope, aged from 9-18. According to the Argus, these children were ‘the sons and daughters of deceased ex-servicemen. Some are in Melbourne for education or employment and others are orphans.’ In the early 1950s, Stanhope was described by the Children’s Welfa

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Victoria

c. 1949 - c. 1977

Blamey House

Blamey House, in Beaumaris, was operated as a children’s home by Melbourne Legacy from 1949. It housed 22 primary school age children of ex-servicemen. In 1956, Blamey House was relocated to Kew. The site of Blamey House, Kew, was formerly a Legacy Home called Holmbush. Blamey House, Kew closed in around 1977. Blamey House was a children’s home operated by Melbourne Legacy in a number of locations, as part of Legacy’s commitment to provide for the children of ex-servicemen. In 1947, the Blamey House Trustees bought a property in Beaumaris to be a toddlers’ home, which was renamed Blamey House. Until 1949, it was used as a home for ex-servicemen. In November 1949, Blamey House at 124 Balcombe Road, Beaumaris was handed over to Legacy to be a children’s home for 22 ‘Legacy wards’. Blamey House accommodated primary school age children. Jenkinson states that Blamey House was for children aged five to nine years (in contradiction with Legacy’s description of Blamey House as

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1979 - current

Mallee Family Care

Mallee Family Care was established in 1979, one of a number of regional programs established by Melbourne Family Care. These new organisations came into being in a policy environment in which the government was pursuing options for children to be placed in ‘care’ in or near the communities in which their families lived. Having been established by Melbourne Family Care, Mallee Family Care became a separate legal entity in 1984.

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1869 - c. 1879

Ballarat Industrial School

The Ballarat Industrial School was a state-run institution, which opened in August 1869. The institution housed 215 girls in 1872. In 1879, the Industrial School closed, and became a reformatory for boys. The Ballarat Industrial School was the only institution in Victoria mentioned by the Royal Commission on Industrial and Reformatory Schools as having had a ‘satisfactory realization of the objects for which industrial schools should be founded’. Despite this, the Commission called for the industrial school system to be abandoned, in favour of the boarding out system. The Ballarat Industrial School housed 215 girls in 1872, according to the report of the Royal Commission on Industrial and Reformatory Schools. In 1879, the Industrial School closed, and became a reformatory for boys. This reformatory closed in 1893 and the building then housed a ‘lunatic asylum’. On the closure of the reformatory, the majority of the boys were accommodated at Mr Wiseman’s Farm at Lilydale, th

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1865 - 1879

Sunbury Industrial School

The Sunbury Industrial School was established in 1865. It was located on Jacksons Hill, in Sunbury. By the end of 1868, the institution housed 651 boys. In around 1880, boys from Sunbury were transferred to the Royal Park Industrial School in Parkville. The Sunbury Industrial School was the first institution created by the government in 1865 in response to the Neglected and Criminal Children’s Act 1864. This Act provided for the establishment of ‘industrial schools’ where children deemed to be ‘neglected’ were to be placed. The institution was on the top of Jacksons Hill, and in 1865 water had to be carted by a horse from the Jacksons Creek. There was insufficient water to clean the wards, bedding and clothes, let alone the children. The water situation had disastrous effects for the children in the Industrial School. In September 1865, it was reported that all but 20 of the 233 children at Sunbury had scabies; 100 had eczema and 38 had ophthalmia (an eye infection that could cau

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Poor youngsters spending happy time at seaside

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Victoria

1864 - 1893

Reformatory for Boys

The Reformatory for Boys was first located aboard the hulk (ship) Sir Harry Smith in 1865. In 1873 the Reformatory moved to Coburg in the grounds of Pentridge prison and was known as the Jika Reformatory for Boys. In 1879 the Reformatory moved to Ballarat. The Ballarat Boys’ Reformatory closed in 1893. From this period, juvenile offenders were generally sent to smaller, private reformatories, run by charitable or religious organisations. A small section of the Royal Park Depot in Parkville was a government-run reformatory from the 1890s. Juvenile offenders in the new colony of Victoria were originally the responsibility of the Penal and Gaols Department. Male offenders were once housed in the hulk Deborah. In 1864, with the passage of the Neglected and Criminal Children’s Act, juvenile offenders came under the umbrella of the new Department of Industrial and Reformatory Schools. Between 1865 and 1873 the former naval hulk, the Sir Harry Smith operated as a

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Victoria

c. 1935 - c. 1955

Melbourne City Mission Toddlers’ Home

The Melbourne City Mission Toddlers’ Home was situated on the same site as the Melbourne Mission’s Maternity Home, which had accommodated babies with their mothers since 1900. The Home accommodated children up to the age of five. In 1955, the Mission amalgamated the Toddlers’ Home and the Maternity Home. The new Home was renamed Hartnett House in 1958. It is difficult to pinpoint the exact establishment date of the Toddlers’ Home, as the Maternity Home (on the same site in Albion Street, Brunswick) had accommodated mothers and babies since 1900. In 1935, the Mission added a nursery to the existing buildings of the Maternity Home in Albion Street. A dedicated ‘Toddlers’ Home’ was erected in 1947, and another new nursery was built in 1950. In 1942 the Children’s Welfare Department noted that the Home had 22 infants and some mothers in the home, but only one State ward. At the next Departmental inspection (1949) the Home’s staff were described as ‘a floating population of trainin

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Victoria

1886 - 1951

Gordon Institute

The Gordon Institute, Melbourne, was established in 1886. It offered boys classes and a place to socialise. The Institute aimed to find boys work placements in the country, but did accommodate some boys aged 5 to 14. In 1951, new facilities were opened in Highett, and the institution became known as the Gordon Home for Boys. The Gordon Institute was established in 1886, but was founded formally on 17 May 1888. It was located in Bowen Street, Melbourne, ‘not far from the Working Men’s College’. The Institute’s object was ‘to rescue children from criminal ways by attracting them from evil associations and pastimes to the premises’. The Institute was established following the efforts of William Mark Forster (who was also a key figure in the establishment of the Try Society). In 1889, Forster and Charles Deynes Barber were approved under s.62 of the Neglected Children’s Act 1887 ‘as persons to whose care neglected children may be committed’. Barber was the superintendent at the Go

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Victoria

1928 - 1977

Bethany Babies’ Home

Bethany Babies’ Home was originally the Geelong Female Refuge when it was established in 1868. From 1928, the Refuge became known as Bethany Babies’ Home. It accommodated pregnant women, babies and toddlers; it operated a maternity hospital and also adopted babies out. In 1977, it ceased to operate as a Home and became Bethany Community Support. From 1977, all records relating to individuals, placements and adoptions at Bethany Babies’ Home were transferred to the Victorian government. Bethany Babies’ Home was originally the Geelong Female Refuge when it was established in 1868. It subsequently provided accommodation for single pregnant women and ‘care’ for babies unable to stay with their families. In 1928, the Refuge began to operate primarily as a babies’ home. It was at this point that it became known as Bethany Babies’ Home. As well as caring for babies and toddlers, Bethany operated as a maternity hospital and accommodated pregnant women. It also operated as a mothercraf

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Victoria

1926 - 1965

Melbourne Orphanage

The Melbourne Orphanage was established in 1926. It was formerly the Melbourne Orphan Asylum. It was located in Brighton where it accommodated boys and girls aged between 3 and 16. By the 1950s, some children were housed in group homes in Glen Waverley. In 1965, it became the Melbourne Family Care Organisation. The Melbourne Orphanage came into being in 1926. Formerly, the institution had been known as the Melbourne Orphan Asylum. It was situated at ‘Windemere’, in Butler Street, Brighton. Butler’s history of the first 100 years of the institution discusses some changes to the buildings and equipment at Melbourne Orphanage from 1926. That year, a radio Master Set was installed in the boys’ cottage, as well as loudspeakers in other cottages so all children could listen. By 1930 a new and larger swimming pool had been built. In 1932, the Managing Director of Bryant and May donated motor driven lathes and other machinery to the Orphanage and it began to offer an engineering class

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Victoria

1900 - 1940

Riddells Creek Girls’ Home

The Riddells Creek Girls’ Home was established by the Salvation Army in 1900. It was reported the Adelaide Advertiser in 1902 that girls living at the Home included girls ‘recruited’ from the ‘Chinese opium dens’ and other ‘vile resorts’ in the slums of Melbourne. The newspaper described the Home as ‘spotlessly clean’, and stated it combined rigid discipline with kind treatment in a religious atmosphere. It was reported that there were 40 girls housed in the Home at that time, and that they were ‘kept busy’ with light gardening work, machine knitting and ornamental needlework.

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Victoria

1947 - 31 January 1986

Kardinia Children’s Home

The Kardinia Children’s Home in Belmont (Geelong) was established in 1947 and was run by the Salvation Army. Originally it opened as a toddler’s home and accommodated children aged between two and five with children sent to Salvation Army children’s homes in Melbourne upon reaching school age. Later on it provided for children of all ages and children often attended the local Belmont Primary School. From 1965 cottage homes were opened on the Kardinia grounds to enable siblings to stay together and the institution was also known as Kardinia Child Care and Family Services Centre. All residential care of children ended at Kardinia on 31 January 1986. In 1983, the residential units declared as approved children’s homes at Kardinia Child Care and Family Services Centre were Paringa Cottage, Attunga Unit, Wallara Cottage, Birralee Unit and Kyewong Cottage. In around 2003 when the property was being “cleaned out”, the personal files of children who had been at the Home were destroyed. I

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Victoria

1897 - 1988

The Haven

The Haven, North Fitzroy, was established by the Salvation Army in 1897. It had various functions over the years, including a maternity home, foundling hospital, babies’ and toddlers’ home, day care centre and hostel for girls with intellectual disabilities. It closed in 1988. The Haven was situated at 73-75 Alfred Crescent, North Fitzroy. It was established by the Salvation Army as a ‘Foundling Home and Refuge’ in a substantial private residence in Alfred Crescent, North Fitzroy in 1897. The private home was modified to provide dormitories, a maternity hospital and a nursery. The Haven was then utilised as a maternity home for young mothers from around the State. In 1932 a two storey hospital and nursing home was erected on the Alfred Crescent site to accommodate infants and toddlers. The Haven operated as a hostel for single mothers, and as a hospital and home for babies and toddlers until the mid 1970s. The hospital section of The Haven was closed in 1967. Expectant mothers

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Victoria

1898 - 1994

The Harbour

The Harbour, in West Brunswick, was established by the Salvation Army in 1898. It operated as a maternity home and home for young women aged 14 to 18. It closed in 1994. The Harbour was situated in Cohuna Street, West Brunswick. According to the DHHS guide ‘Finding Records’, the commercial laundry that operated at the Harbour closed in the 1960s. From that time, the institution focused on the needs of teenage girls, supporting their transition to independent living. From the mid 1960s until it closed in 1994, the institution was known as Hillview House. The Harbour was mentioned in the Commonwealth Contribution to Former Forced Adoption Policies and Practices Inquiry (2012) as an institution that was involved in forced adoption.

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Victoria

1902 - 1915

Glenroy Girls’ Home

The Glenroy Girls’ Home was established by Salvation Army in 1902, with the first girls in residence coming from the recently closed Brunswick Girls’ Home. The home had capacity for 60 girls between the ages of four and eighteen. It was situated in a leased property known as “Ashleigh”, in Widford Street, Glenroy. Girls at the home received domestic training in housework, cooking, laundry, sewing, and dairy-work. They were often sent out to work in private homes as domestic servants from the age of 14 or 15. The home closed in 1915, and the remaining girls were transferred to the Salvation Army’s newly purchased Catherine Booth Home in Kew.

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Victoria

1915 - 1976

Catherine Booth Girls’ Home

The Catherine Booth Girls’ Home was established by the Salvation Army in 1915 in ‘Blackhall’ mansion, East Kew. The Home accommodated girls aged between 4 and 16. The Catherine Booth Girls’ Home closed in 1976. The Catherine Booth Girls’ Home was situated at 26 Sackville Street, East Kew, in a mansion known as Blackhall. Catherine Booth and her husband William were the founders of the Salvation Army. The first girls to move into the Catherine Booth Home were those from the recently closed Glenroy Girls’ Home. In November 1955, Catherine Booth Girls’ Home was declared an approved children’s home under the Children’s Welfare Act 1954. The East Kew Home accommodated about 90 to 100 girls. During the mid 1950s attempts were made to convert the large scale dormitories to smaller unit accommodation. In the 1960s, the Home began accepting boys aged 2 to 8 years, to keep siblings together. By 1969, its capacity had reduced to 48 with an increasing emphasis on small group care for girl

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Last Updated: July 17th, 2024

Many Neighbours

Many Neighbours is a video from the Red Cross Red Crescent historic film collection. It is a short promotional film about the Australian Red Cross Society released in 1949. It was made for the Victorian Division of the Red Cross and depicts various services in repatration hospitals, convalescent homes, civilian hospitals and in homes of outpatients (The Sun News-Pictorial, 1949). It includes footage of Welfare House in St Kilda, Victoria, a convalescent home for mothers and children.

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Victoria

1913 - 1984

Box Hill Boys’ Home

The Box Hill Boys’ Home was established by the Salvation Army in 1913. The Home first accommodated 45 younger boys, but in later years it housed a wider range of ages of boys in different ‘sections’. The Home closed in 1984. The Box Hill Boys’ Home was located at 310 Elgar Road, Box Hill. It opened officially on 29 May 1913. Initially named the Howard Home for Boys (after the then Chief of Staff, Commissioner Howard) the Home at Box Hill was established after a fire destroyed a building at the Salvation Army’s Boys’ Home at Bayswater, earlier in 1913. Until 1913, all boys in the ‘care’ of the Salvation Army lived at Bayswater. The Box Hill Boys’ Home was for younger boys, and originally accommodated around 45. By the late 1920s, there was 150 boys at Box Hill, with plans for further expansion. The Salvation Army established the Box Hill Boys’ Home in a two-storey building ‘in one of the highest points of that highly elevated and desired suburb’. The first boys at Box Hill w

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Victoria

1946 - c. 2004

Lyndon Lodge

Lyndon Lodge was a hostel run by the Salvation Army to provide ‘aftercare’ for boys leaving the Bayswater Boys’ Homes. It opened in 1946 in a property known as ‘Talana’ in Auburn, an area of Hawthorn. It provided accommodation for up to 30 boys between the ages of 14 and 18 who were learning trades or working in the city. The boys were expected to pay their own maintenance costs where possible. In 1987 the Salvation Army sold the property at Auburn, and Lyndon Lodge moved to a smaller home on Walker Street, Murrumbeena. Lyndon Lodge had closed by 2004. Lyndon Lodge was initially located in a two-storey Victorian mansion on a one acre property on the corner of Auburn Road and Harcourt Street, Auburn (an area of Hawthorn). The son of Howard Broadstock, who managed Lyndon Lodge from 1958 to 1964, reminisced about his time living there: What a place for a kid to grow up in; a house that looked like something from a horror movie with turrets and gargoyles, lots of space to r

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South Australia

1926 - c. 1975

Aboriginal Women’s Home, North Adelaide

The Aboriginal Women’s Home opened at North Adelaide in 1926 as a boarding house for Aboriginal women and children. The Adelaide City Mission ran the Home with financial assistance from the government. The Home accommodated up to 22 women and children, many from country areas who were in Adelaide for medical treatment. The Home closed in 1975 and its functions were taken over by the Klemzig Family Home. The Aboriginal Women’s Home opened in Sussex Street, North Adelaide in 1926 in a building that had previously been the old City Mission Hall. The Aborigines’ Friends’ Association had approached the committee of the City Mission 18 months earlier about the need for a boarding house for Aboriginal women and children, particularly those from country areas, coming to the city for medical treatment (The Register, 30 June 1926). The Association and the Chief Protector of Aborigines had great difficulty finding suitable accommodation for these visitors to Adelaide (The Advertis

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Victoria

1897 - 1987

Bayswater Boys’ Homes

The Bayswater Boys’ Home was established by the Salvation Army in 1897 at The Basin. It accommodated boys who had been placed in legal custody. The campus included three Bayswater Boys’ Homes. These Homes closed progressively from 1980. The last, the Bayswater Youth Training Centre, closed in 1987. The Salvation Army established the Bayswater Boys’ Home in 1897 at The Basin, to cater for boys who had been placed in legal custody. Bayswater was the name of the railway station nearest the Home. There were a number of ‘Bayswater Boys’ Homes’ at The Basin. As well as ‘Bayswater Boys’ Home No 1′, there was a separate junior section (Bayswater Boys’ No 2 Home). The No 3 Home operated from 1930 until 1947, and housed boys who were not classified as ‘reformatory cases’. After its closure, boys were transferred back into No 1 Home, which was rebuilt and expanded in 1946. No 2 Home catered for boys who could not be placed at the Salvation Army’s Home in Box Hill, because they were too o

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City Mission Rest Home [original title altered]

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Adelaide’s Poor: City Mission’s Work

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Victoria

1959 - c. 1985

Hillside Boys’ Home

Hillside Boys’ Home, in Wheelers Hill, was established by the Victorian Government in 1959. It accommodated 30 to 40 school-age boys who were considered ‘unacceptable’ for other homes or foster care. Hillside included a school. It closed in around 1985. Hillside Boys’ Home, in Jells Road, Wheelers Hill, Glen Waverley, was established by the Victorian Government in 1959, to relieve ‘congestion’ at Turana, Royal Park. Hillside accommodated 30 to 40 school-age boys. In 1959, the Department described its residents as ‘of a type not acceptable in foster homes or in institutions and they had no interested parents or relations who could provide a reasonably decent home for them’. The Department described some of the Hillside boys as ‘persistent absconders’. Many of its residents had had a disrupted experience of school, and thus required a ‘special school’ type of education. This was provided in a two-classroom school on the Hillside site. Hillside was closed following a regional rev

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Victoria

1968 - c. 1992

Baltara Reception Centre

Baltara Reception Centre was established by the Victorian Government in 1968. It was a separate entity from Turana, which was located on the same campus. Baltara was a specialised reception facility for boys aged 10 to 15 as well as a remand centre for boys in the same age group. Baltara comprised a number of different sections with different functions that changed over time. In the late 1970s, Baltara began to function as a long-term facility, mainly catering for boys who had experienced placement breakdowns or an unsuccessful return home. From 1985, Baltara was a youth training centre. In 1991, the Victorian government announced the impending closure of Baltara, and a new approach in the child and youth welfare system. For the first time, the law would ensure the separation of young people who had committed offences from young people on protection orders (The Age, 14 March 1991). In 1991, non-offenders at Baltara were moved into community-based facilities, in line with the policy of

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A Boarding-Home for Aboriginal Women and Children

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New South Wales

c. 1958 - c. 1990

Thornbury Lodge

Thornbury Lodge was a children’s and infants’ home established at Baulkham Hills in 1958 or 1959, by the Child Welfare Department. It was a receiving home, and was set up to increase facilities for children in transit from foster homes to hospitals, institutions or other placements as Bidura had become too crowded. Thornbury Lodge housed 30 preschool-aged children, initially just girls but by the 1970s housed both sexes. It had closed by 1990. The NSW State Records Archives Investigator site states that Thornbury Lodge was established to ease overcrowding at Bidura, in Glebe, by increasing reception facilities. It appears to have served the same function as Bidura, which was temporary accommodation for children in transit from foster homes to hospital or other establishments, and between Children’s Court appearances. Thornbury Lodge was established in a historic house on Seven Hills Road, Baulkham Hills. According to a 1990 archaeological study by Wendy Thorp, the land was first

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North Adelaide Home Opened

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Victoria

1867 - 1921

Ballarat Female Refuge

The Ballarat Female Refuge was established in 1867 by a group of protestant women, with the objective of reforming ‘prostitutes’. It became a shelter for single mothers. It was the first such institution on Australia’s goldfields. In 1921, the Refuge became part of the Ballarat Town and City Mission Rescue and Children’s Home. Initially, the Female Refuge was managed by a ladies’ committee and a committee comprising lay men and ministers from various Protestant denominations. The Ballarat Female Refuge’s first location was in Grant Street, Ballarat. In 1885, it moved to new premises at 183 Scott Parade. In 1921, the Ballarat Town and City Mission took over the management of the Ballarat Female Refuge. At this time, a new institution for single mothers and their babies was established by the Mission, on the site of the original Refuge at 183 Scott Parade. This institution was known as the Ballarat Town and City Mission Rescue and Children’s Home. The Alexandra Babies’ Home (

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Care of Sick and Needy

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Unique N.A. Boarding House

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Female Refuge Complex, 183 Scott Parade, Ballarat East [former site]

This two-storey building was constructed c.1884. Before the building at 187 Scott Parade was built for the Alexandra Babies’ Home (later known as the Alexandra Toddlers’ Home), babies and their mothers were accommodated at this site.

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Victoria

c. 1909 - 1974

Alexandra Babies’ Home

The Alexandra Babies’ Home was established in around 1909. It housed up to 36 children aged under five years of age. Most were state wards. Many children were transferred to the Ballarat Orphanage when they were four. In 1964, it was known as the Alexandra Toddlers’ Home. It closed in 1974. The Alexandra Babies’ Home in Ballarat East was on the same site as the Ballarat Town and City Mission Rescue and Children’s Home. The Babies’ Home accommodated boys and girls under 5 years of age. The Home had a capacity of 36 children, and most of the children were state wards. The Home also acted as a ‘feeder home’ to the Ballarat Orphanage, with children being transferred there once they reached the age of four. A new single storey building for the Babies’ Home at 187 Scott Parade was completed in 1909. Originally, babies were accommodated at the Ballarat Female Refuge at 183 Scott Parade. There is some confusion about the date when the Babies’ Home was established as a separate institu

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Victoria

c. 1966 - 2008

Acheron Youth Training Centre

Acheron Youth Training Centre at Buxton was established in the mid 1960s as a facility for young people in Victoria’s youth training centres, particularly Turana. Acheron provided ‘adventure camp facilities’ and other training programs and a 350 acre minimum-security camp near Buxton. Approximately 300 ‘trainees’ a year went to Acheron in work groups. These trainees received instruction in building and grounds work as part of their treatment program. An additional 1500 trainees a year attended adventure camps at Acheron. From 1970, girls from Winlaton were also using the camp. In 2003, Acheron was part of the Melbourne Juvenile Justice Centre, providing an ‘alternative custodial option’ for young men aged 17-21.

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Victoria

1960 - 1985

Harrison House

Harrison House in Hawthorn was established in 1960. Run by the Presbyterian Church of Victoria, it provided hostel-style residential accommodation for wards of state, boys on probation from the courts or institutions, and boys coming to Melbourne to find work from Kilmany Park in Gippsland. In its early years, it was known as Arthur Harrison Boys’ Home. In around 1977/78 it became known as Harrison House Youth Hostel. In 1977, the newly-established Uniting Church took over management of the Home from the Presbyterian Church. The hostel underwent refurbishment in 1978 and 1982. In 1985, the institution at Hawthorn closed. That year, a new service, Harrison House Youth Services, was established in Mitcham. The Home was named after a former Director of Social Services of the Presbyterian Church, Arthur G. Harrison. It was established out of Rev. Harrison and his congregation at the West Hawthorn Presbyterian Church being concerned about the needs of boys leaving Kilmany Park in Gippsla

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Victoria

1974 - 1991

Copelen Street Family Centre

The Copelen Street Family Centre was established in 1974 in South Yarra. It included a children’s care centre, offered family counselling, and provided foster care. By the late 1980s the South Yarra property was sold and in 1991, the Centre was renamed Copelen Child and Family Services. The Copelen Street Family Centre grew out of a Parents and Children’s Centre, established in 1974 in the buildings of the Methodist Babies’ Home, at 12 Copelen Street, South Yarra. It described itself in 1979 as offering “a range of non-residential services designed to promote family life and prevent family breakdown” (Copelen Street Family Centre, Fiftieth Birthday 1929-1979). This centre offered a variety of programs including Adoption and Permanent Care, parent skills training, a day care centre, a drop-in centre, and family counselling and support. It was also a provider of foster care in the inner suburbs of Melbourne. In 1984, the adoption legislation in Victoria led to Copelen sett

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Victoria

1928 - 1977

Presbyterian Babies’ Home

The Presbyterian Babies’ Home opened in 1928 in East Melbourne. In around 1933, the Home relocated to Camberwell. It housed babies and children up to the age of four. In 1977, it became the Canterbury Family Centre. The Argus newspaper reported on the opening of The Presbyterian Babies’ Home by Lady Stonehaven on 26 October 1928. It was located in a remodelled portion of the Old Scotch College, Lansdowne Street, East Melbourne. The Babies’ Home launched an appeal in 1929 to raise £5,000 to help its work ‘caring for unwanted children’. The Presbyterian Babies’ Home relocated to Camberwell, to a former mansion known as ‘Linda’, donated to the Church in 1929. The ‘Linda’ mansion, at 19 Canterbury Road, Camberwell was donated to the Presbyterian Church in 1925, by Elizabeth McNeill McCormick in 1925 in memory of her late father, WJ Craig. The Babies’ Home was invited to take over the Camberwell site in 1929. Previously, it housed a hostel for young women known as the

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1 January 1917 - 16 June 1972

Files – Child Welfare, State Records Office of Western Australia

‘Files – Child Welfare’ is a large series of files on administrative matters relating to the welfare of children in out of home care in Western Australia from 1917 to 1972. It contains files created by the State Children’s Department and the Child Welfare Department. Many records in this series directly relate to the administration of children’s homes, and some records name children and young people who came into contact with the Department or other agencies. The records also document actual and proposed policy and practice, and correspondence with private agencies and inter-state government departments involved in child welfare. Access Conditions This series includes records with both open and restricted access. Open access records can be ordered from SROWA by any member of the public. Individuals will need to apply to the Department of Communities, Freedom of Information Unit in order to access restricted records. Records This series includes records relating to

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1898 - 1908

Files – Chief Protector of Aborigines

Files – Chief Protector of Aborigines is a record series created by the office of the Chief Protector of Aborigines and held at the State Records Office of Western Australia. It contains correspondence received by the Chief Protector of Aborigines on a range of matters, including the management of and admission of children to missions and other institutions, births, deaths, and marriages, police matters, provision of relief and rationing, medical treatment, employment and movement of Aboriginal people, and communication on various topics with the Aborigines Protection Board. Many of the items in this series are titled with the names of the individuals or families that they relate to. Access Items in this series are open access. For access to these records please contact the State Records Office of Western Australia. Records The below document contains a list of items in this series that may be of relevance to Care Leavers. The items are arranged by the Home/Instit

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1916 - 1927

Files (Aboriginal matters) – Chief Secretary’s Department

Files (Aboriginal matters) – Chief Secretary’s Department were created by the central registry of the Colonial Secretary’s Office/Chief Secretary’s Department (even though much of the correspondence was sent to, and from, the Chief Protector of Aborigines or his deputy). The files in this series, along with the files from the Department of the North-West (Records Series No. 2029), comprise the main collection of files relating to Aboriginal matters between the period 1920 and 1926. This series includes records relating to missions and other institutions, the removal of children, rationing and ‘relief’, employment, movement of Aboriginal people, ethnographic studies, education, health and medical treatment, and a large number of ‘personal’ files relating to named individuals or families. Access Conditions This series contains records with both open and restricted access. Open access records can be ordered from SROWA by any member of the public. Individuals will need to apply

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1 January 1926 - 16 June 1972

Files – Aborigines Departments

Files – Aborigines Department is an archival series which comprises records that were created by the Aborigines Department and its successor agencies – the Department of Native Welfare and the Department of Native Affairs – up until 1972 when welfare functions, and their associated files, were transferred to the newly created Department for Community Welfare. This record series covers a wide range of matters which the department/s were responsible for administering. This series includes records relating to missions, children’s homes, policies of child removal, Aboriginal reserves, stations, hospitals and medical treatment, education, Aboriginal cultural sites, practices, and artefacts, Royal Commissions, annual and other reports of the departments, and files relating to individual people. Access Conditions Some items in this series have open access, and can be ordered from the State Records Office of Western Australia. Other items in this series are restricted to protect per

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1909 - 1920

Files – Department of Aborigines and Fisheries

Files – Department of Aborigines and Fisheries contains both inward and outward correspondence of the Department, filed by subject. Subjects the files deal with include missions, children’s homes, institutions, the removal of children from families and communities, lock hospitals, movement and employment of Aboriginal people, requests for permission for marriage, contracts and permits, exemptions from the Aborigines Act, reserves, cattle stations, and relief and inspection, as well as matters to do with fisheries and fauna. Some of these files relate to individuals and families, and include their names within the titles. Access Conditions The majority of the records in this series are open access. Open access records can be ordered from SROWA by any member of the public. A small number of records in this series have restricted access. Individuals will need to apply to the Aboriginal History Research Services in order to access restricted records. Records A number

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

25 August 1908 - 23 December 1990

Files – Community Welfare (“A” Series), State Records Office of Western Australia

‘Files – Community Welfare (“A” Series) is a very large series of files on administrative matters relating to the welfare of children in out of home care in Western Australia from 1908 to 1990. It contains files created by the Public Charities and State Children’s Department, the State Children’s Department, the Child Welfare Department, the Department for Community Welfare and the Department for Community Services. Records in this series often name children and young people who came into contact with the Department or other agencies. Records also document actual and proposed policy and practice. Access Conditions This series includes records with both open and restricted access. Open access records can be ordered from SROWA by any member of the public. Individuals will need to apply to the Department of Communities, Freedom of Information Unit in order to access restricted records. Records This series includes records relating to the administration of children’s

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1899 - 1987

Files – General

Files – General is a series of records created by the Central Board of Health, the Public Health Department, and the Health Department of Western Australia. It is the main series of files for these agencies, and includes records dealing with public health, sanitation, hospitals and medical institutions, correspondence with local boards of health, environmental health matters, and outbreaks of disease. It also includes a small number of records relating to missions, wards of the state, and children’s Homes. Access This series contains records with both open and restricted access, and records for which access requirements have not yet been determined. For access to open records please contact the State Records Office of Western Australia. For access to restricted records please contact the Freedom of Information Coordinator, Department of Health. Records This series contains a small number of records relating to missions, wards of the state, and children’s homes. Th

  • Archival Series

Last Updated: July 15th, 2024

Western Australia

1949 - 1976

Administration Files – South West District Office [S.D. Sequence]

Administration Files – South West District Office [S.D. Sequence] is a series containing records created by the South West Division of the Department of Native Welfare and the Department of Native Affairs. The files are concerned with education, health, housing, employment, missions and reserves, and staffing. Gnowangerup, Narrogin, Collie, Katanning, Kojonup, Broomehill, Dumbleyung, Tambellup and Borden are included in this district. Access The majority of the records in this series have restricted access in order to protect personal privacy, however there are some records in this series with open access. For access to restricted records, please contact the Aboriginal History Research Services. Open access records can be ordered directly from the State Records Office of Western Australia. Records This series contains a number of records relating to missions, hostels, and training farms. These records include reports, registers of people living in missions, admiss