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Western Australia - Organisation

Heathcote (1929 - 1994)

From
1929
To
1994
Categories
Care Provider, Disability Institution, Government-run, Home and Hospital
Alternative Names
  • Heathcote Hospital (later known as, 1966 - 1994)
  • Heathcote Mental Hospital (also known as)
  • Heathcote Reception Home (originally known as, 1929 - 1965)

Heathcote began in 1929 on Point Heathcote at Applecross. It was first known as the Heathcote Reception Home, and was a government hospital for people with 'recent and recoverable' mental illness. Heathcote sometimes housed Children and adolescents. It closed in 1994.

Details

The Royal Commission into Lunacy recommended in 1922 that a new hospital be built to treat people with acute 'mental disorders'. The Commissioners believed there was 'no marked line dividing sanity from insanity; there are degrees intervening which must be recognised and provided for…there is, so to speak, nothing between sanity and Claremont'. They described a movement away from the custodial model to a more active treatment model of care: 'insanity is a disorder insidious in character and slow in onset; that more often than one can accurately estimate, the patient goes through a period - varying in each case - during which skilled treatment, properly administered, will prevent an impending attack or successfully deal with it in its early stages' (pp.6-7). Heathcote, as the hospital was named, was to be that observation and treatment centre.

In its Report (p.7), the Royal Commission was specific in its description of the future 'Acute Mental Hospital and Reception Centre' - in what it should include by way of patients, facilities, staff and treatments; and in whom it should exclude: 'senile dements, well-marked congenital defectives, obviously chronic insanity, general paralysis and epilepsy'.

Events

22 February 1929 - 1994
Location - Heathcote was located on Point Heathcote in Applecross. Location: Applecross

Related Legislation

  • Mental Treatment Act 1927 (1927 - )

    The Mental Treatment Act 1927 allowed voluntary patients at Heathcote to be transferred involuntarily to the Clarement Hospital for the Insane if they had not 'recovered' after six months.

Related Organisations

Publications

Book Sections

  • Gillgren, Christina, 'Once a Defective, always a Defective: Public Sector Residential Care 1900-1965', in Errol Cocks (ed.), Under blue skies : the social construction of intellectual disability in Western Australia, Centre for Disability Research and Development, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, 1996, pp. 53-91. p.69. Details

Online Resources

Photos

Certificate, Mental Treatment Act 1927
Title
Certificate, Mental Treatment Act 1927
Type
Document
Date
1927
Source
Collection of Historical Images, Mental Health Museum WA Inc
Note
‘Certificate, Mental Treatment Act 1927’ shows the type of form that would have been used at Heathcote to admit a voluntary patient.

Details

Ward at Heathcote Hospital, ca. 1939
Title
Ward at Heathcote Hospital, ca. 1939
Type
Image
Date
1939?
Source
Western Australian images, State Library of Western Australia

Details

Glossary of terms relating to mental hospitals, Western Australia
Title
Glossary of terms relating to mental hospitals, Western Australia
Type
Document
Date
2012
Source
Dr Philippa Martyr, Department of Health Western Australia

Details

Researching Your Family History in Western Australia through Mental Health Records
Title
Researching Your Family History in Western Australia through Mental Health Records
Type
Document
Date
9 May 2012
Source
Mental Health Museum of WA Inc, Info-Sheet-Family History-A4-final.pdf

Details

Sources used to compile this entry: 'AU WA A793 - Heathcote Mental Hospital', in State Records Office of Western Australia - Organisations & People, State Records Office of Western Australia, 2015, https://archive.sro.wa.gov.au/index.php/heathcote-mental-hospital-au-wa-a793; Gillgren, Christina, 'Once a Defective, always a Defective: Public Sector Residential Care 1900-1965', in Errol Cocks (ed.), Under blue skies : the social construction of intellectual disability in Western Australia, Centre for Disability Research and Development, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, 1996, pp. 53-91. p.69..

Prepared by: Debra Rosser