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Tasmania - Organisation

Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys (1921 - 1973)

  • Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the front

    Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the front
    Details

From
1921
To
1973
Categories
Approved Children's Home, Care Provider, Children's Home, Home and Non-denominational
Alternative Names
  • Glenara Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys (Also known as, 1971 - 1973)

The Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys opened in Glenara in 1921. Before 1946, most of the boys were state wards. After that, the Home also admitted them by private arrangement. In 1971, the name changed to Glenara Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys. It became Glenara Children's Home in 1973.

Details

The Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys was located at Glenara, Franklin Village, which is near Launceston, in an eight roomed house set on 13 acres.

It was run by a non-denominational Management Committee.

The Home opened with 14 boys but had a capacity for 30.

Frank and Anne Parkin were the first Superintendent and Matron of the Home. They were members of the Salvation Army with no experience of looking after children, apart from raising their own son and daughter. Before taking up their positions, they toured some mainland Homes to find out how they operated. By the end of the 1920s, the Parkins and the Committee were having major disagreements. At the heart of them, according to Daniel Smedley, was the Parkins' zealous approach to child saving, which the more moderate Committee opposed. The Parkins left in 1927.

The next appointments, Major and Mrs LGH Bradgate, were also inexperienced. The Committee sacked them in 1929 because the Major could not manage the boys. He may also have been an alcoholic.

Ivan and Daphne Filluel replaced the Bradgates. They had some experience, having taken over when the Bradgates were on leave in 1928. Smedley says that the management of the Home improved after that. The couple were still there in 1955 when Daphne Filluel received an MBE.

The Home provided entertainments for the boys. For instance, in 1925, they had a holiday at George Town. They also attended the Friendly Societies' Picnic, a sports event held when the British fleet visited, the National Agricultural Society's show, and the picnic held by the Church of England in Franklin Village. Sometimes there were joint outings with the girls from Launceston Girls' Home. The Annual Report commented that:

The Committee are grateful for the kindly interest taken in our boys in providing these outings which help to materially brighten their lives and teach them to appreciate what is being done for them.

From 1929 onwards, the boys had a holiday every year at Meercroft near the bluff in Devonport. They also played football and cricket, coached by Ivan Filleul.

In the 1920s, the boys attended Franklin Village State School and from the 1940s onwards, Youngtown State School. For further education, boys could study at the Technical College in Launceston. However, those with the ability to go on to the State High School were not allowed to sit the qualifying exam.

After leaving school, most of the boys found employment on farms. To prepare for it, they carried out work on the small farm at the Home after school hours. It produced milk, cream, eggs, vegetables and, at one time, meat from sheep and cattle.

This appears to have come at a cost. Former residents made claims to the 2003-4 Ombudsman's enquiry that they were forced to work excessively at all types of farming duties, including milking, and digging drains and ditches, in all weather, without footwear or protective clothing.

Annual Reports of the Home, published in the Annual Reports of successive child welfare departments, suggest that the Home slowly began to encourage the boys' studies. In 1941, one boy attended Warren's Business College, having been offered free tuition. In 1956, two attended Launceston High School. From 1967 onwards, the Home had tutors to help boys with their school work.

About this time, according to Anna Haebich and Doreen Mellor, one of the aims of the Home became providing a higher education for young Indigenous people. In 1966, the Committee formed a sub-committee to bring them from Cape Barren Island to Launceston for further education.

In 1950, to provide temporary accommodation for the staff, Meercroft Hospital put up a house on the property where the boys had their holidays. A couple of years later, it became the property of the Home. In 1954-5, the dilapidated old dormitory was demolished and replaced with a new building.

In the 1960s, the Superintendent introduced a holiday scheme for boys to stay with families instead of going to Devonport. This continued until the Home closed.

The Committee purchased a property at 56 Racecourse Crescent in 1954 to use as a hostel for boys who had left the Home and started an apprenticeship or other form of employment.

Location

1921 - 1973
Location - Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys was situated on Hobart Road, Glenara. Location: Glenara

Timeline

 1921 - 1973 Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys
       1973 - 1982 Glenara Children's Home
             1984 - c. 1995 Glenara Training Services

Related Archival Items

Related Archival Series

Related Glossary Terms

Related Organisations

Related Places

Publications

Books

  • The Nation's best asset; the Home for boys: on the doorstep to a new life - health, happines and a chance … Help the great work, Held at the Hobart izone, call number TL.P 362.732 NOR, Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys, Launceston, 1945. Details
  • Childs, Terry, Franklin Village: an early Tasmanian town, National Trust of Australia, Launceston, 2005. Details
  • Haebich, Anna and Mellor, Doreen, Many voices: reflections on experiences of Indigenous child separation, National Library of Australia, 2002. p.122. Details
  • Hanson, Dallas, Why are they in children's homes : report of the ACOSS children's home intake study, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1979, 83 pp. Details
  • Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys, Memorandum and articles of association of the Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys, The Home, Launceston, 1953. Details

Reports

  • Annual report of the Charitable Grants and Children of the State Department: report for 1924-25, Charitable Grants and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1925-26. Details
  • Social Services and Children of the State Department: Report for 1934-5, Social Services and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1935. Details
  • Social Services and Children of the State Department: report for 1939-40, Social Services and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1941. Details
  • Social Services Department: Report for year ended 1949-50, Social Services Department, Hobart, 1950. Details
  • Ombudsman Tasmania, Listen to the children: Review of claims of abuse from adults in state care as children, Office of the Ombudsman, Tasmania, Hobart, November 2004. Details
  • Ombudsman Tasmania, Review of claims of abuse from adults in state care as children - Final Report - Phase 2, June 2006. Details

Online Resources

Photos

Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the back
Title
Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the back
Type
Image

Details

Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the front
Title
Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys at Glenara - view from the front
Type
Image

Details

Sources used to compile this entry: Annual report of the Charitable Grants and Children of the State Department: report for 1924-25, Charitable Grants and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1925-26; Social Services and Children of the State Department: Report for 1934-5, Social Services and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1935; Social Services and Children of the State Department: report for 1939-40, Social Services and Children of the State Department, Hobart, 1941; Social Services Department: Report for year ended 1949-50, Social Services Department, Hobart, 1950; Report of the Stolen Generations Assessor, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania, 2008, http://www.dpac.tas.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/53770/Stolen_Generations_Assessor_final_report.pdf; Haebich, Anna and Mellor, Doreen, Many voices: reflections on experiences of Indigenous child separation, National Library of Australia, 2002. p.122.; Ombudsman Tasmania, Listen to the children: Review of claims of abuse from adults in state care as children, Office of the Ombudsman, Tasmania, Hobart, November 2004; Ombudsman Tasmania, Review of claims of abuse from adults in state care as children - Final Report - Phase 2, June 2006; Valentine, Barbara, 'Northern Tasmanian Home for Boys', in The companion to Tasmanian history, Centre for Tasmanian Historical Studies, 2006, http://www.utas.edu.au/library/companion_to_tasmanian_history/N/Northern%20Tasmanian%20Home%20for%20boys.htm.

Prepared by: Caroline Evans