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Western Australia - Organisation

Parkerville Children's Home (1909 - 2005)

  • Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring [Wattle Cottage]

    Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring [Wattle Cottage], 27 June 2013, courtesy of YouTube.
    Details

From
1909
To
2005
Categories
Anglican, Care Provider, Cottage Home, Home, Orphanage and Protestant
Alternative Names
  • Children's Home, Parkerville (also known as)
  • The Children's Home, Parkerville (also known as)
  • Parkerville Home (also known as)
  • Parkerville Orphanage (also known as)
  • Parkerville Orphanage and Parkerville Homes (also known as)
  • Parkerville Orphanage for Infants, Parkerville (also known as)
  • Parkerville Orphanage, Parkerville (also known as)
  • Parkerville Waif's Home (also known as)
  • Waif's Home (also known as)

The Parkerville Children's Home continued the Waifs' Home, Parkerville from 1909. It was run by the Community of the Sisters of the Church from 1909 to 1925 and from 1925 to 2005 by the Parkerville Children's Home Incorporated. Over time, Parkerville developed a range of youth care and family services, including non-residential programs. In 2005 Parkerville Children's Home became Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc).

Details

Although the institution that became known as the Parkerville Children's Home opened in 1903 as the Waif's Home, Parkerville, it wasn't until 1909 that Parkerville was scheduled as a subsidised institution under the State Children Act 1907. This enabled Parkerville to receive some government subsidy for the children who lived there. Sister Kate Clutterbuck was the person who was most widely known as the instigator of Parkerville, but histories acknowledge the combined effort of members of the Anglican religious order, Community of the Sisters of the Church, and other volunteers in establishing the Home.

Parkerville was unusual in Western Australia because it began with a desire to keep children in family groups, with boys and girls together, in cottages rather than large dormitories. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children were sent to Parkerville by child welfare authorities, their families and the children's courts.

Located in a bushland setting in the hills east of Perth, Parkerville was also very isolated from the city in its early years. The location later became known as Beacon Road, Parkerville.

A letter of appreciation of the The Daily News Orphans' Christmas Cheer Fund in 1915 gives an insight into life at Parkerville, where the children lived mostly within the grounds of the Home. The letter shows that donations enabled the children to occasionally go on outings and have other experiences:

warmest thanks and gratitude to you for the Christmas gift, which enabled us to take the children in parties to the seaside at Cottesloe Beach, and a party of the boys to camp out at Crawley Bay…It also means health and strength for the coming year. The days spent on the beach made the time fly only too quickly…we all want to send you our heartfelt thanks for giving the children this beautiful time. Letter, 12 February 1916 published in The Daily News 2 December 1916, p.10

Government reports (Signposts 2004 pp.414-422) give a glimpse of the size of Parkerville in its second decade: 22 children at year end in 1920, 39 children in 1922, 14 children in 1929. It is unclear how reliable these numbers are, because in 1935, the annual report of the Child Welfare Department stated that 800 children had lived at Parkerville in its first 32 years and that when Sister Kate was forcibly retired in 1933, there were 130 children in residence. Possibly, the government reports concerned mainly children who were wards of the State and children under 6 years of age. From the 1920s to the 1940s, records also show that some of the working-age children from Parkerville were placed out 'at service' with employers. This was an arrangement where a child was sent to work with an employer, under a legal agreement.

In 1925, the Parkerville Children's Home Incorporated was established to run the Home, though they did not manage the day to day operations of the Home.

Whittington (Sister Kate 1999) records the instability in managing and governing Parkerville from the 1930s to the 1950s. In 1933, the Community of the Sisters of the Church withdrew from Parkerville and the Sisters of the Society of the Sacred Advent worked at Parkerville until 1941, when the Community of the Sisters of the Church again returned to work at Parkerville. By 1949, the Community of the Sisters of the Church had again withdrawn from Parkerville at the request of the Parkerville Children's Home Incorporated. Parkerville was subsequently managed by the Anglican Orphanages Board of Management from 1949 until 1954 and then by the Anglican Homes Board for the remainder of the 1950s, after which the Parkerville Children's Home Incorporated took a more active role in the governance and management of the Home.

Until 1953, reports (Signposts, p.417) show that children went to primary school in the grounds of Parkerville and to the Midland Junction or Mt Helena high schools. By 1954 all children were going to government schools.

Although Parkerville was established with the idea of keeping children together in family groups, the reality of this in the 1940s was brought into question at the Inquiry into Children in Institutional Care (Forgotten Australians 2004, p.43):

When we arrived at Parkerville, we were separated…I hardly got to see my sister at Parkerville. She got very sick with rheumatic fever and because she didn't get treatment early enough, spent 6 months in Royal Perth Hospital…medical treatment was almost non-existent at the Home…There were about 30 kids per cottage. We slept on the veranda and in winter up in the hills it was freezing…Beltings were common for all the kids and mostly were not deserved.

From 1957, government reports (Signposts, p.417) show that Parkerville continued to be a large home, admitting children who were wards of the State and also children who were 'private admissions' (placed in Parkerville by family or others). From 1957 to 1962, there were on average about 130 children at Parkerville each year. By 1961, there were 79 children who were wards and 68 who were private admissions. From 1963 to 1966 (p.418), the number of children who ran away were reported as 'abscondings'. These were few, but the figures reported may not be reliable.

By 1975, Parkerville became smaller. It was described in that year (Signposts, p.418) as having 23 children aged 5 to 17 years old living there, with the children's families being involved in some programs. There were 6 cottages, with playgrounds, bikes and a range of sporting equipment. Holiday and foster placements were 'actively sought' for the children and outside recreations such as Police and Citizens Youth Groups, Girls' Brigade and local sports were encouraged, according to government reports.

By at least 1982, Parkerville had houses (known as 'scatter cottages' or 'group homes') in the suburbs of Perth and the campus at Parkerville continued to also house children. In 1988, reports (Signposts, p.421) show that just over 10% of the children had been at Parkerville for more than two years.

Through the 1990s, Parkerville continued to provide medium to long-term accommodation and programs for children and young people in cottages at its Parkerville campus and in suburban houses.

On 1 June 2005, Parkerville was incorporated as Parkerville Children and Youth Care Inc.

There is a bush cemetery about 3 kilometres west of the site of Parkerville Children's Home, where approximately 30 childeren are buried. The wooden crosses that once marked the graves were burnt in a bushfire and replaced by concrete ones. In 2010, a plaque was erected lat the cemetery, listing the names of 24 of these children.

Events

1909 - 2005
Location - Parkerville Children's Home was situated at the corner of Roland and Beacon Roads (near the corner of Wilson Road), Parkerville. Location: Parkerville

Timeline

 1903 St Peter's Boys' School, Fremantle
       1903 - 1909 Waif's Home, Parkerville
             1909 - 2005 Parkerville Children's Home
                   2005 - Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc)

Related Glossary Terms

Related Organisations

Publications

Books

  • Casey, Kevin, Parkerville: Caring for Children - Care for Their Future, Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc), Parkerville, Western Australia, 2010. p.198. Details
  • Doncaster, Edward William, The Sisters of the Church in Kalgoorlie 1902-1916: a record, Riverside Press, Renmark, South Australia, 1998. Details
  • Fraser, Bronwen, History of the Parkerville Children's Home, 1902-1993, 1993. Details
  • McCracken, Jenni, A penny for the ponies: the work of the Community of the Sisters of the Church at Parkerville Children's Home (1903-1933), 1990. Details
  • Whittington, Vera, Sister Kate: a life dedicated to children in need of care, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, Western Australia, 1999. pp.157-158; 436-438. Details

Book Sections

  • 'Colonial Secretary's Department', in JS Battye (ed.), The Cyclopedia of Western Australia (1912), vol. 1, Hesperian Press, Victoria Park, 1985, pp. 502-507. Details
  • Kesson, Anna, 'Girls Friendly Society', in Gregory, Jenny and Jan Gothard [editors] (eds), Historical Encyclopedia of Western Australia, University of Western Australia Press, Crawley, W.A., 2009, p. 414. Details

Newspaper Articles

  • 'Survivor returns the favour', The West Australian, 5 March 2011. Details

Reports

  • Annual report of the State Children Department, State Children's Department, [Perth, W.A.], 1908-1927. Annual Report 1910, pp.3, 8, 16, 18); Annual Report 1911, pp.3, 6, 8, 13, 15; Annual Report 1913, p.12; Annual Report 1917, pp.1, 15. Details

Resources

  • Baldwin, Angelica, Interview with Angelica [Annie] Baldwin] [sound recording] / [interviewed by Patricia Barrett-Lennard], 1983. Details

Online Resources

Photos

A General View of the Home
Title
A General View of the Home
Type
Image
Date
8 September 1912
Source
National Library of Australia

Details

Children's party, 2 December 1944
Title
Children's party, 2 December 1944
Type
Image
Date
2 December 1944
Publisher
State Library of Western Australia

Details

Parkerville Gravesite (2)
Title
Parkerville Gravesite (2)
Type
Image
Date
11 August 2010
Source
Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc) Photographic Archive

Details

Parkerville Gravesite (1)
Title
Parkerville Gravesite (1)
Type
Image
Date
11 August 2010
Source
Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc) Photographic Archive

Details

Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring [Wattle Cottage]
Title
Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring [Wattle Cottage]
Type
Image
Date
27 June 2013
Source
YouTube

Details

Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring
Title
Parkerville Children and Youth Care celebrates 110 years of caring
Type
Video
Date
27 June 2013
Source
YouTube

Details

Sources used to compile this entry: Annual report of the State Children Department, State Children's Department, [Perth, W.A.], 1908-1927. Annual Report 1910, pp.3, 8, 16, 18); Annual Report 1911, pp.3, 6, 8, 13, 15; Annual Report 1913, p.12; Annual Report 1917, pp.1, 15.; 'The Daily News [Christmas Cheer Fund]', The Daily News, 2 December 1916, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81358001; 'Submission No. 181 Inquiry into Children in Institutional Care: Submissions', in Inquiry into Children in Institutional Care - Submissions received by the committee as at 17/3/05, Senate Community Affairs Committee, Commonwealth of Australia, 28 July 2003, http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Community_Affairs/Completed_inquiries/2004-07/inst_care/submissions/sublist; Casey, Kevin, Parkerville: Caring for Children - Care for Their Future, Parkerville Children and Youth Care (Inc), Parkerville, Western Australia, 2010. p.198.; Department of Commerce, 'Parkerville Children and Youth Care Incorporated', AssociationsOnline, Government of Western Australia, 2012, https://associations.commerce.wa.gov.au/associations/public/publicHomePage.jspx; Information Services, Department for Community Development, 'pp.411-414, Table 36: Young People at Parkerville Children’s Home, Certain Years between 1920 and 1996', Signposts: A Guide for Children and Young People in Care in WA from 1920, Government of Western Australia, 2004, http://signposts.cpfs.wa.gov.au/pdf/pdf.aspx; Kesson, Anna, 'Girls Friendly Society', in Gregory, Jenny and Jan Gothard [editors] (eds), Historical Encyclopedia of Western Australia, University of Western Australia Press, Crawley, W.A., 2009, p. 414; McGuire, Bob, 'New plaque for Parkerville babies', in Inside: life in children's homes, National Museum Australia, 15 December 2010; Parliament of Australia Senate, Forgotten Australians: A report on Australians who experienced institutional or out-of-home care as children, Senate Community Affairs References Committee, http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Community_Affairs/completed_inquiries/2004-07/inst_care/report/index.htm. p.43.; Whittington, Vera, Sister Kate: a life dedicated to children in need of care, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, Western Australia, 1999. pp.157-158; 436-438..

Prepared by: Debra Rosser