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Western Australia - Organisation

Castledare (1934 - 1983)

  • Castledare Slideshow

    Castledare Slideshow, 1940s - 1960s, courtesy of Historical Photos DVD produced by Michael Hogan and Peter Bent in 2004. Christian Brothers Institution Albums 1 & 2 (Holy Spirit Collection).
    Details

From
1934
To
1983
Categories
Catholic, Children's Home, Home, Receiving Agency and School
Alternative Names
  • St Vincet's Preparatory School for Boys (also known as)
  • Castledare Boys' Home (also known as)
  • Castledare Boys' Orphanage (also known as)
  • Castledare Junior Orphanage for Boys (also known as)
  • Castledare Orphanage (also known as)
  • Castledare School (also known as)

Castledare was established by the Christian Brothers in Queen's Park (later, Wilson) on the site of the former Castledare Special School. It began as a residential primary school for boys aged from around 6 to 12 years, including boys who were wards of the State and boys who were placed privately (by family or others), in premises previously used for the 'Castledare Special School'. Mostly, boys placed at Castledare were aged 8-10 years. Australian-born boys were sent to Castledare, as were child migrants (1947-1966). Castledare has had many name variations over the years, usually keeping 'Castledare' somewhere in the title. Castledare closed in 1983.

Details

A residential institution, Castledare, operated on a site in what became 100 Fern Road, Wilson (originally, Queen's Park) from 1934 until 1983. It was run by the Christian Brothers. Castledare was originally (1929-1934) a 'special' school for boys with learning difficulties; and from 1934 it became a more general educational and residential institution that accommodated boys from various backgrounds including wards of the State, child migrants, orphans and private admissions. Although it began with boys aged 6-12 years, it became more common for Castledare to admit boys aged around 8 to 10 years. British and Maltese child migrants, and Australian-born Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal boys lived at Castledare.

Barry Coldrey writes of Castledare (The Scheme 1993, p.67):

Besides State wards it gradually attracted 'private' pupils and in a few years, there were about the same number in each class. Some parents found it convenient to place their children in Castledare because of some family emergency, and it served as a moderately priced boarding school. The school was periodically inspected by Officers of the Child Welfare Department.

Coldrey also explains that to 'remove objections of parents' Castledare was called 'St Vincent's Preparatory School for Boys' in 1934. But that name does not appear in the Child Welfare Department Annual Reports. In that same year, 1934, 'Castledare School' was the name given to the institution in the annual report of the Child Welfare Department (p.4). In the annual report of the CWD, the Home is called 'Castledare' (p.3), 'Castledare School' (p.15); in the annual report CWD 1937, it is 'Castledare' (p.4) and 'Castledare Junior Orphanage for Boys (Roman Catholic) Queen's Park (p.6). In CWD annual report (combined years 1937-38 and 1938-39), it is 'Castledare' (pp.4,5) and 'Castledare Junior Orphanage for Boys, Queen's Park (Roman Catholic) p.6. The CWD annual report 1946 has the names Castledare Orphanage (pp.6,7,13), Castledare Boys' Home (pp.8,9,10), and Castledare Junior Orphanage, Queen's Park (p.16); the 1951 CWD annual report refers to Castledare Orphanage (pp.10,11, 15), Castledare Boys' Orphanage (p.12), Castledare Junior Boys' Orphanage (p.13). The 1952 CWD annual report refers to Castledare Junior Boys' Orphanage (p.10), Castledare Orphanage (p.12), Castledare Junior Boys' Orphanage, Queen's Park (p.15) and Castledare (p.15).

Government reports (Signposts 2004, pp.144-148) don't show the number of boys resident in every year, but it can be seen from published figures that Castledare's greatest period of growth was after World War II. In 1937, there were 42 boys at Castledare. Between 1957 and 1968, there were around 100 boys at each year's census. By 1975, there was accommodation for around 45 boys and in 1982, there were 32 boys.

Some boys stayed at Castledare for short periods, while others remained there for years at a time. Castledare's purpose when it opened in 1934 was to educate primary-school age boys who would progress to 'farm schools' at Clontarf or Tardun. Some boys, who lived most of their childhoods in Christian Brothers' institutions, did follow this path. But Castledare also seems to have been used to accommodate boys for shorter periods of time and in response to referrals from child welfare authorities or families. From the admissions data available, it seems there was always a high proportion of 'private' admissions to Castledare.

During World War II, the boys remained at Castledare and in 1944 the institution was inspected by Mr W. Garnett, from the British High Commission. According to Coldrey (the Scheme 1993, pp.177-178), Garnett was not impressed with conditions at Castledare and found it to be 'poorly equipped' with a 'low standard' of accommodation. As Garnett was inspecting Castledare with a view to sending post-war child migrants there, his negative report concerned authorities.

In evidence to the Inquiry into Children in Institutional Care, later known as the 'Forgotten Australians' inquiry, a man described (Forgotten Australians 2004, p.42), a life in Castledare that has left a deep impression on him: 'In 1950 aged 7 years along with other children, I was transferred to Castledare. This is where Hell on earth began. In 1954, aged 11, I was sent to Clontarf Boys Town a few miles away, where Hell continued for the rest of my childhood'.

Published, official, reports generally present a brighter picture.

The Christian Brothers' institutions Castledare, Bindoon, Clontarf and Tardun first received widespread publicity about child abuse in the early 1990s. In 1993, the Christian Brothers in Western Australia issued an apology and from 1995 have funded independent services to help with family tracing, counselling and remedial education for men who had suffered in their institutions. Many former residents of these institutions have shared their experiences and memories (bad and good) at government inquiries, in books and in oral histories.

In April 2014, sexual abuse of boys at Castledare was one of the matters scrutinised by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses into Child Sexual Abuse.

Castledare closed in 1983, but the chapel remains open.

Events

1934 - 1983
Address - Castledare was located at 100 Fern Road, Queen's Park, Wilson. Location: Wilson

Timeline

 1929 - 1934 Castledare Special School
       1934 - 1983 Castledare

Related Events

Related Glossary Terms

Related Organisations

Publications

Books

  • Coldrey, Barry M., The Scheme: the Christian Brothers and Childcare in Western Australia, Argyle-Pacific Pub., O'Connor, W.A., 1993. pp. 67, 177-178. Details
  • Knight, Ivor Alan, Out of darkness : growing up with the Christian brothers, Fremantle Arts Centre Press, South Fremantle, 1998. Details

Reports

  • Western Australia. Child Welfare Department, Annual Report of the Child Welfare Department, Child Welfare Department, Perth [W.A.], 1928-1972. 1934, pp.3, 4, 15; 1937, pp. 4, 6; 1937/1938, pp.4-6; 1938/1939, pp.4-6; 1946, pp. 6-10, 13, 16; 1951, pp.10-13, 15; 1952, pp.10, 12, 15. Details

Online Resources

Photos

The Christian Brothers' Agricultural School, Tardun, Western Australia
Title
The Christian Brothers' Agricultural School, Tardun, Western Australia
Type
Document
Date
c. 1936

Details

Castledare Slideshow
Title
Castledare Slideshow
Type
Video
Date
1940s - 1960s
Source
Historical Photos DVD produced by Michael Hogan and Peter Bent in 2004. Christian Brothers Institution Albums 1 & 2 (Holy Spirit Collection)

Details

Boys in 'factions', 1950
Title
Boys in 'factions', 1950
Type
Image
Date
1950
Creator
Dease Studios
Publisher
State Library of Western Australia

Details

Dormitory, 1950
Title
Dormitory, 1950
Type
Image
Date
1950
Creator
Dease Studios
Publisher
State Library of Western Australia

Details

CEMWA Response to Moss Questionnaire
Title
CEMWA Response to Moss Questionnaire
Type
Document
Date
1951
Source
National Archives of Australia

Details

John Moss C.B.E. U.K. Child Welfare Expert. Visit to Australia. Part II
Title
John Moss C.B.E. U.K. Child Welfare Expert. Visit to Australia. Part II
Type
Document
Date
1951 - 1952
Source
National Archives of Australia
Note
There is information about Castledare in the John Moss Visit to Australia file Part II, please see pp.29, 106, 121, 127, 137

Details

Enquiry by Mr. John Moss. Points on which information is needed as to provision for the welfare of children emigrating from the United Kingdom to Australia
Title
Enquiry by Mr. John Moss. Points on which information is needed as to provision for the welfare of children emigrating from the United Kingdom to Australia
Type
Document
Date
10 May 1951
Source
National Archives of Australia

Details

Sources used to compile this entry: Coldrey, Barry M., The Scheme: the Christian Brothers and Childcare in Western Australia, Argyle-Pacific Pub., O'Connor, W.A., 1993. pp. 67, 177-178.; Information Services, Department for Community Development, 'pp.142-148, Table 7: Young People at Castledare, Certain Years between 1929 and 1983', Signposts: A Guide for Children and Young People in Care in WA from 1920, Government of Western Australia, 2004, http://signposts.cpfs.wa.gov.au/pdf/pdf.aspx; Parliament of Australia Senate, Forgotten Australians: A report on Australians who experienced institutional or out-of-home care as children, Senate Community Affairs References Committee, http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Community_Affairs/completed_inquiries/2004-07/inst_care/report/index.htm. p.42.; Western Australia. Child Welfare Department, Annual Report of the Child Welfare Department, Child Welfare Department, Perth [W.A.], 1928-1972. 1934, pp.3, 4, 15; 1937, pp. 4, 6; 1937/1938, pp.4-6; 1938/1939, pp.4-6; 1946, pp. 6-10, 13, 16; 1951, pp.10-13, 15; 1952, pp.10, 12, 15..

Prepared by: Debra Rosser